Aeration Results

Proven success cleaning water bodies of all sizes

Clearing Up a Drinking-Water Problem

Tuesday, June 02, 2015

CASE STUDY:
Bear Gulch Reservoir, Atherton California

The Challenge

Customers of California Water Service Company were complaining of a foul, musty taste to the drinking water coming from Bear Gulch Reservoir in Atherton, California.

The problem was clear (even if the water wasn’t): Harmful blue-green algae growth and excessive organic compounds—caused by years of fertilizer runoff and nutrient loading—were fouling this beautiful water body in the heart of Silicon Valley. Even after treatment in the water plant, these organic components can produce by-products that leave water tasting bad.

 Read More

Solving a Major Eurasian Water Milfoil Infestation—Naturally

Friday, May 29, 2015

CASE STUDY:
Our Most Remarkable Eurasian Water Milfoil Success Story to Date

The Challenge

Pickerel Lake is a shallow 140-acre lake in Southwest Michigan. With a maximum depth of only 10 feet, the lake was particularly susceptible to invasive Eurasian Water Milfoil. In 2012, over 85% of the lake was consumed by the thick growth, with milfoil topped all the way to the surface on 70% of the entire lake. The infestation was so heavy that hundreds of frogs were living on top of the weeds with no fear of predation from bass or other game fish.

 Read More

AirStream Technology, the Natural Way to Reclaim Your Lakefront

Tuesday, May 26, 2015

CASE STUDY:
Solving Lakefront Weed, Algae and Muck Problems

The Challenge

Lots of Muck, excessive lily pads and milfoil -- not uncommon for many lakefront properties. Cutting weeds or dowsing them with chemicals is at best a temporary band-aid to a deeper problem. A Southwest Michigan Lakefront owner was looking for an alternative to clear up over a foot of organic muck on his shoreline that was feeding excessive weed growth making it difficult to swim and get the boat in and out.

 Read More

Reclaiming an Urban Pond

Friday, May 22, 2015

CASE STUDY:
From Urban Disaster to Urban Oasis

The Challenge

Duck Pond on Croton-on-Hudson, New York, was once a pleasant urban park. Over time, however, it had gradually deteriorated into a mess most residents avoided. When we first saw the pond, we were tempted to rename it “Duckweed Pond”: Nearly the entire surface was coated with a thick blanket of duckweed and water meal. From a distance, the pond looked like a green swamp, and below the surface, thick beds of coontail filled the water column.

 Read More

Delivering Better-Tasting Water to Residents on Boston’s North Shore

Wednesday, May 06, 2015

CASE STUDY:
Eliminating Manganese in a Raw-Water Reservoir

The Challenge

Wenham Lake, a 220-acre reservoir operated by the Salem/Beverly Water Supply Board, provides drinking water to several hundred thousand residents on Boston’s North Shore. Complaints of “funny-tasting,” discolored water were rising along with treatment costs. The culprit: high levels of manganese, a problem that plagues many water-supply reservoirs. When the reservoir runs out of oxygen at the bottom, chemical reactions release manganese and iron from the sediments into the water. Because these compounds are difficult and expensive to remove in the water plant, the result is often yellow/rust-colored, bad-tasting, drinking water.

 Read More